Daily Dose

Daily Dose by Heather Page. Silk screen on vellum, 24 inches by 18 inches

Title: Daily Dose
Media: Silk screen on vellum
Size: 24”h x 18”w
Edition: 1/50-50/50
 
detail | installation | process | edition | related works

detail view

Daily Dose by Heather Page, detail image. Silk screen on vellum, 24 inches by 18 inches

installation views

Daily Dose Installation by Heather Page, front view.  Silk screen on vellum, wood, vinyl, linoleum, 7 feet x 6 feet x 6 feet
Daily Dose Installation by Heather Page, 3/4 view.  Silk screen on vellum, wood, vinyl, linoleum, 7 feet x 6 feet x 6 feet
Daily Dose Installation by Heather Page, ¾ back view.  Silk screen on vellum, wood, vinyl, linoleum, 7 feet x 6 feet x 6 feet
Daily Dose Installation by Heather Page, interior view.  Silk screen on vellum, wood, vinyl, linoleum, 7 feet x 6 feet x 6 feet

process

Daily Dose is an original silk screen print on vellum in eleven colors printed from six silk screens.
Brown line transparency for Daily Dose by Heather Page, ink on frosted mylar, 24 inches x 18 inches
Brown line transparency for Daily Dose by Heather Page, ink on frosted mylar, 24″ x 18″
 
We make silk screen prints by pushing ink through a stretched piece of mesh.
 
Images are made by blocking out parts of the mesh. We call this a stencil. There are all sorts of ways to make stencils. For Daily Dose, I used photographic and drawing fluid stencils.
 
I used a direct photographic emulsion to make my screens photosensitive.
 
Here’s how it works:

  1. I coat a screen with the emulsion and let it dry in the dark.
  2. I then place a transparency—an opaque image on a transparent background like the one on the left—on the screen and expose the two to light.
  3. Next, I wash out the screen with water. Any part of the screen that was covered by the opaque image washes away, leaving a thin stencil that is the inverse of the image. So, the transparent background in the transparency is now a green coating on the screen and the black image is now open–or uncovered–mesh.
  4. When I squeegee ink through the screen, it can only pass through the washed-out image area, creating a print that looks just like the image.
A drawing fluid stencil is a lift ground, meaning that the drawing is lifted through another material.
 
Here’s how it works:

  1. I paint an image directly on a screen with a sugary paint we call drawing fluid. Water-soluble crayons also work.
  2. Once it dries, I squeegee a red paint called screen filler over the entire screen.
  3. When the screen filler is dry, I wash the screen in hot water. The drawing fluid dissolves, leaving open mesh wherever I painted.
  4. When I squeegee ink through the screen, it can only pass through the washed-out image area, creating a print that looks just like the painting I made.
 
More information on silk screen printing
Information on multi-color printmaking

edition

There are fifty prints in this edition, numbered 1/50-50/50, forty-four of which have been modified for installation purposes. There is also a lithographic version of Daily Dose, printed in an edition of twenty.

 
More information on editions

related works